Stories of Remembrance

Army, First World War (1914-18)George Edward Goodman,

He was a well-respected soldier among the battlefields and his reputation as a kind, caring and courageous person was recognised by many soldiers.
Mansohail Singh, St Monica's College, Epping

George Edward Goodman was a private in the 21st Battalion of the 12th reinforcement during The Great War. George was born in May 1878 in Epping Victoria and enlisted at the age of 38 years and 10 months, on 29th January 1916. George lived in South Melbourne with his wife, Annie Laurie Goodman, and his Daughter, Ruby Mavie Goodman. George had only served in the Australian Army for a matter of months after he had arrived. He was a well-respected soldier among the battlefields and his reputation as a kind, caring and courageous person was recognised by many soldiers. During the Great War, George travelled to many places. These included England, Belgium and Etaples in France where he was seen fighting his last battle on 12 May 1916; also the date where he had been reported missing in the field. He was later known to be “killed in action” in France on 24 November 1916. It is also known that on 1 April 1916, he made his last ever payment of 3 pounds to his wife and children in Australia. Although his wife and Daughter were proud of his efforts throughout the war, George’s brother, John Goodman had later tried to sell the war medals that George had earned throughout his short service. On 4 January 1922, John had written a letter to authorities expressed his “desire to dispose of war medals etc.” A month later on 13 February 1922, authorities had written a letter back to John that the goods of the late soldier will be given according to the law that states the order of who will receive them. The letter read that they will be given in accordance of the following. “Widow, eldest surviving son, eldest surviving daughter, father, mother, eldest surviving brother…” as the law stated, George’s wife Annie had the rights to keep her husband’s medals etc. before John. Later that year, the medals were given to Annie Goodman for safekeeping.

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