Stories of Remembrance

Army, First World War (1914-18)George Goodman,

He had a good reputation among his peers and according to Private M.Delzoppo he was a very respectable soldier.
Akashdeep Cheema, St Monica's College, Epping

George Edward Goodman was a Private in the 21st Battalion, 12th reinforcement when he left Australia on 4 April 1916. He served in the Australian infantry from 1916 to 1917 and was killed in action whilst serving in France. He had a good reputation among his peers and according to Private M.Delzoppo he was a very respectable soldier. He was considered to be a fit soldier and some of his personal characteristics were:

Height: 5 feet and 3.75 inches
Weight: 144 pounds
Chest: 34/37 inches
Complexion: fresh
Eyes: brown
Hair: brown
Religion: Church of England
Distinctive marks: scar left by a vaccination on the left arm and scar on right cheek.

George Edward Goodman was born in Epping, Victoria in May 1878 and was a tanner (someone who tans animal hides to use for leather and other materials). Later, he lived in South Melbourne with his wife (Annie Laurie Goodman) and daughter (Ruby Mavie Goodman). Whilst serving in the army, he travelled to places like England, Etaples (France) and Belgium. During this time, the 21st Battalion, in which Goodman served, were fighting at Bullecourt. On his way to the battlefield, Goodman travelled on the HMAT Euripides (A14), which weighed approximately 15,050 tons and carried over 1,200 passengers. It carried the 7th Light Horse Regiment, the 12 Reinforcement and the 2nd Light Horse Brigade. Although Goodman was seen as a brave soldier by many, his brother, John Goodman, attempted to dispose of his war medals. Fortunately the claim was turned down and the mementos were given to his widowed wife. Goodman was missing in action whilst serving in France on 24 November 1916 and was reportedly confirmed to be killed in action on 3 May 1917. He is currently buried at Tilloy British Cemetery in France.

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