Remembrance Day

On Sunday 11 November, 2018, the Shrine commemorated Remembrance Day and the 100 year anniversary of the guns falling silent on the Western Front, signalling the end of the First World War.

CENTENARY OF ARMISTICE

Click here to enjoy images and details of activities that marked this historic period in time at the Shrine.

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Historical Information About Armistice Day, Remembrance Day and the Shrine of Remembrance

In late 1918, after more than four years of bitter fighting, Allied forces finally broke stubborn German resistance and forced Germany to sue for peace. Entire nations cheered as fighting ceased and the armistice took effect at 11am on the 11th November 1918. One year later the first commemorations to mark the end of the war were held across the Commonwealth on the 11th November 1919. At the request of King George V the people of the Empire ceased work at 11am to hold a two minute vigil to remember the fallen. This vigil would evolve into the minute's silence of today's Remembrance Day services.

By the end of the Second World War Armistice Day had grown from solely a remembrance of  the men and women of the Great War into something larger, becoming a day to honour all those who had fallen in war.  With this evolution came a change of name and 11 November became known as Remembrance Day. Under this name Australians today remember all those who served and sacrificed during times of war and on peacekeeping operations in recent decades each November 11. Services are held at memorials, RSL clubs and schools across the country and 11am on this day, each including a minute's silence dedicated to the fallen.

Armistice Day was the date chosen for two key events at the Shrine of Remembrance; the foundation stone was laid on 11 November 1927 and the Shrine was officially dedicated on 11 November 1934. The dedication was witnessed by more than 300,000 people, more than half the population of Melbourne and the largest crowd seen in Australia at that time.